Future Studland

Future Studland

Future Studland

The National Trust and Dorset Coast Forum are working in partnership to build a long-term plan for the Studland area.

Project overview

The Future Studland plan will look ahead for the next 20 to 50 years. A key area it will explore is the balance between the area being a hugely popular place for people, as well as a nationally important wildlife habitat. It will also encompass travel and transport options, accessibility and the infrastructure in the area. We want to know how people are using the spaces now and what they would like to see in Studland for years to come.

A plan of this kind ensures that all local stakeholders have some guidance when making decisions.

Why is this needed?

Studland is a wild and natural peninsula and is the eastern gateway to the Isle of Purbeck as well as the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site. It has a wide range of landscapes, habitats, land uses, buildings, heritage features, commercial centres and residential areas. It is a popular tourist destination, attracting over 1 million visitors, per year as well as being home for many residents and businesses. The scope of this project will cover all the of the Studland Peninsula from Shell Bay to Old Harry Rocks and encompasses the beaches, roads, services and habitats as well as the village itself.

Like many other areas of the UK, Studland is impacted by rapid coastal change. In the last two winters alone, major storm action has put huge pressure on the coastline, moving large swathes of beaches and edging closer to important infrastructure. Coastal erosion has been taking place for thousands of years but coupled with rising sea levels, some of the main facilities at Studland will be lost over the next 20-50 years and the local shoreline management plan suggests no active intervention should take place to prevent this. You can find out more about managing the coastline from the Shoreline Management Plan(External link) and the National Trust publication Shifting Shores(External link).

The National Trust have identified four key themes for the plan:

  • Wild identity
  • Infrastructure
  • Travel and access
  • Visitor Distribution and communications

Dorset Coast Forum are asking the community, stakeholders and visitors what they think should be included on the Future Studland Plan. This will take place through a series of engagement events, drop ins and activities as well as the tools on this site and questions will be asked around the themes.

#CoastalConnection  #CoastalInnovation 

Who’s listening?

Elaine Snow

Elaine Snow

Dorset Coast Forum Project Officer

Future Studland - Join the Conversation!

Charmouth Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP)

Charmouth Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP)

Charmouth Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP)

Charmouth has been selected for funding as part of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Environment Agency’s Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP). 

 Project overview

The Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP) helps communities to plan for the long term, including through interventions such as improving and replacing damaged community infrastructure like beach access or coastal transport links, repurposing land in coastal erosion zones for different uses such as temporary car parks, and restoring and creating habitats to include green buffer zones.

Why now and why do we need to do something different?

England has some of the fastest eroding coastline in Europe. Coastal erosion is a natural, ongoing process that has been happening for thousands of years. But with sea levels continuing to rise into the next century, the rate of coastal erosion in some places will accelerate.

For some coastal locations it will unfortunately no longer be technically or economically feasible to provide protection from flooding and coastal change.

As the risks of erosion increase and accelerate with climate change, we need to explore now how local authorities can work with and support people living, working and using coastal areas that cannot sustainably be defended in the long term.

The CTAP aims to:

  • Accelerate strategic planning (and associated action planning) to set out how the coastal local authorities, partners and communities will address the long-term transition of communities, businesses and assets away from the coastline at risk.
  • Support the trialling of early on the ground innovative actions in support of medium and long term plans, that enable those coastal areas at significant risk to address the challenges posed by a changing climate.

The programme will run to March 2027, exploring and testing innovative opportunities. A full evaluation of the programme will help to inform future national policy direction and will add to the other coastal resilience activity managed by the Environment Agency, which includes a national coastal erosion risk map providing clearer data about local risks to help local planning.

The Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme supports the Environment Agency’s FCERM Strategy, which provides a longer-term vision of how we will better protect and prepare homes and businesses from flooding and coastal change and create climate resilient places.

#CoastalConnection  #CoastalInnovation 

Who’s listening?

Dan Williams

Dan Williams

Dorset Coast Forum Project Officer

Find out more about the Charmouth Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP)

Swanage Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP)

Swanage Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP)

Swanage Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP)

Swanage has been selected for funding as part of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Environment Agency’s Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP). 

 Project overview

The Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP) helps communities to plan for the long term, including through interventions such as improving and replacing damaged community infrastructure like beach access or coastal transport links, repurposing land in coastal erosion zones for different uses such as temporary car parks, and restoring and creating habitats to include green buffer zones.

Why now and why do we need to do something different?

England has some of the fastest eroding coastline in Europe. Coastal erosion is a natural, ongoing process that has been happening for thousands of years. But with sea levels continuing to rise into the next century, the rate of coastal erosion in some places will accelerate.

For some coastal locations it will unfortunately no longer be technically or economically feasible to provide protection from flooding and coastal change.

As the risks of erosion increase and accelerate with climate change, we need to explore now how local authorities can work with and support people living, working and using coastal areas that cannot sustainably be defended in the long term.

The CTAP aims to:

  • Accelerate strategic planning (and associated action planning) to set out how the coastal local authorities, partners and communities will address the long-term transition of communities, businesses and assets away from the coastline at risk.
  • Support the trialling of early on the ground innovative actions in support of medium and long term plans, that enable those coastal areas at significant risk to address the challenges posed by a changing climate.

The programme will run to March 2027, exploring and testing innovative opportunities. A full evaluation of the programme will help to inform future national policy direction and will add to the other coastal resilience activity managed by the Environment Agency, which includes a national coastal erosion risk map providing clearer data about local risks to help local planning.

The Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme supports the Environment Agency’s FCERM Strategy, which provides a longer-term vision of how we will better protect and prepare homes and businesses from flooding and coastal change and create climate resilient places.

#CoastalConnection  #CoastalInnovation 

Who’s listening?

Sara Parker

Sara Parker

Dorset Coast Forum Project Officer

sara.parker@dorsetcouncil.gov.uk
Tel. 01305 224728, Mobile: 07780 148790

Find out more about the Swanage Coastal Transition Accelerator Programme (CTAP)

Portland Underhill to Wyke Regis FCRM Project

Portland Underhill to Wyke Regis FCRM Project

Portland Underhill to Wyke Regis Flood and Coastal Risk Management (FCRM) Project

    Working in partnership to define the long-term (100 year) sustainable, adaptable and integrated approach to coastal flood and erosion risks. 

    Project overview

    There are currently a number of increasing pressures on coastal management in the project area, which are expected to worsen with climate change and sea level rise. These include:  

    • Aging assets and infrastructure 
    • Chesil beach is migrating back into the Fleet / Portland Harbour due to overtopping events and front face erosion 
    • Land instability around Chesil Cove and the West Weares  
    • The risk posed by sea level rise and climate change to the A354 causeway road from both the Lyme Bay and Portland Harbour sides.  
    • The impacts of climate change on coastal processes and water levels will become increasingly harder to predict.   

    Dorset Council, working in collaboration with the Environment Agency and with support from BCP Council, Dorset Coast Forum and technical consultants AECOM, are undertaking a project to develop a new FCRM Strategy for the area shown in the map. 

    The new FCRM Strategy will define the long-term (100 year) sustainable, adaptable, and integrated approach for managing the risks of coastal flooding, erosion and land-sliding, taking into account the latest data and evidence.

    #CoastalInnovation #CoastalConnection

    Figure 2: Portland Underhill to Wyke Regis FCRM Strategy project extent and key locations

    Portland Underhill to Wyke Regis FCRM Strategy project extent and key locations.

    Who’s listening?

    Dan Williams

    Dan Williams

    Project Officer, Dorset Coast Forum

    Portland Underhill to Wyke Regis Flood and Coastal Risk Management (FCRM) Project

    Lyme Regis Cobb Stabilisation Scheme

    Lyme Regis Cobb Stabilisation Scheme

    Lyme Regis Cobb Stabilisation Scheme

      The scheme aims to reinforce and repair the Cobb, a historic Grade 1 listed harbour. The harbour is essential as a historic monument, a breakwater that protects the town and coastline from erosion and flooding, and as the site of numerous businesses and livelihoods.  

      Project overview

      Sea-floor erosion, combined with the localised movement of stone blocks due to wave impact on the outer harbour wall and the deterioration of the structure on the inner harbour wall, have seen significant destabilisation of the structure.

      It is predicted that the functionality of the Cobb as a breakwater would end in the 2040’s, potentially resulting in the loss of the harbour, and over 100 residential and non-residential properties will be at increased risk of flooding and coastal erosion.

      The project aims to stabilise the Cobb to maintain its status as a breakwater, a coastal flood and erosion defence and a safe harbour for many different types of vessels and businesses.

      It is being proposed to strengthen and stabilise the structure which may include construction of a low-level concrete toe foundation strengthening wall along with tension piles to anchor the inner harbour walls.

      Design options have been extensively reviewed by the project team and the wider statutory authorities including Historic England, Marine Management Organisation, and the Environment Agency. The project team are currently reviewing the scheme design options with a view to come to a preferred option that can be presented to stakeholders and the public. The preferred design will have a material effect upon construction timeline and therefore the project team is not in position to comment upon the construction programme at this time.

      #CoastalInnovation #CoastalConnection

      Who’s listening?

      Dorset Coast Forum

      Dorset Coast Forum

      Community Engagement

      Find out more about Lyme Regis Cobb Stabilisation Scheme